Archives for category: diaper reviews

Today I was able to get diapered and I experienced the difference between a good and bad diapering.  I started this morning by using a cloth stuffer inside an Attends Breathable Brief.  I bought a couple packs of these Attends awhile back at a thrift store and while they were super cheap they are also super bad diapers.

With nothing but the diaper on I went about the house doing chores and what not.  Multiple times the bottom tapes came undone and the tops had to be readjusted several times.  I had only wet it a bit at this point.  I put on some pants and went to town to pick up a few items.  When I bent over to pick something up I felt the bottom tapes come undone again.  I didn’t really wet in feat of a leak.

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My home made onesie keeping up a very swollen Molicare diaper.

I took the diaper off at home and found that almost every bit of padding had migrated between the legs and the tapes wouldn’t really stay tight. This was about an hour and half into wearing it and just a little wetting. Wearing something like this is a joke.  It’s absorption is laughable, it’s so uncomfortable.  I can’t imagine it working for anyone.  I decided to try a better diaper and went all out for a better experience.

 

I folded a very thin home made cloth diaper with two thin cloth stuffers.  It’s probably good enough for a couple wettings but very light.  Then I put on a Molicare Super over it.  When it comes to good diapers I’ve tried the Molicare Super is one of my favorites.  It’s super comfortable.  The cloth diapers become saturated and spread the wetness out around the diaper.  Since they are tightly pinned on they help keep the wetness from sagging as much.  As they get full the diaper underneath starts soaking it up.

Afterwards I put on my homemade onesie.  This is really the key.  Anyone who wears diapers should have a onesie.  Quality diapers like Abena and Molicare work well without them but so much better with them.  Even cheap diapers like my Attends work much better when the padding is held in place by a onesie.

side view

side view

With my onesie on I did some more chores, then did 20 minutes on the elepitical, afterwards doing a few sets of deadlifts and some other lifting.  All the while I was drinking lots and lots of water, way more then I needed.  In an hour the diaper was wet, way wetter then the Attends before but still exactly where it should be.   It was much more comfortable and two hours later it’s soaked.  The front padding is saturated and beyond squishy, but its staying put and the moisture is finding it’s way to the back of the diaper.  I could probably wear this another hour.

Saddly the Molicare doesn’t have the super thick gel padding that Abenas and ABDL diapers like Tykables have.  This diapers performe like baby diapers in that they just keep swelling and swelling.  The Molicare defeintly has less padding, but still performs far better then a generic diaper.

Infants and children in diapers have very different needs from adults who just wear diapers for fun.  I was at a relatives house recently who have 2 children in diapers, they use all in one cloth diapers at home and usually disposables when they travel.  Their diaper pail was a big hamper full of smelly cloth diapers.  The all in ones are comically thick and bulky.  They have raised several children and talked about how they used to use disposables and change them the moment they noticed they were wet, and went through way more diapers then they needed to.  They said the cloth diapers were so thick that they didn’t need to be changed as often  and they were sure they were saving money.

Adult babies who aren’t dependent on diapers should look at some of the advantages of cloth for their diaper needs.

Lets compare

Cost:  I’m just going to generalize that a decent adult disposable diaper like an Abena costs about 2 dollars each.  If you were only able to wear a few times a month then a case of these might last you all year.  Who knows what the average adult baby does, but I typically wear 3 days a week and could probably get away with 3 Abenas.  Which means about a 300 dollar cost for the year.

Now lets say instead I buy some cloth diapers and plastic pants.  Cloth prefolds are going to run you about 25 bucks, a good all-in-one is about 40. Plastic pants can be had for as little as 5 bucks.  I’m only wearing 3 times a week but maybe I might want some back up.  I could get a super thick all-in-one, and 4 prefolds, with 4 plastic pants for around 150 dollars.  These diapers will last far longer then a year, if they were worn once a week they may last a life time.  The plastic pants will need to be replaced but that’s the cheapest part.

How about the cost of washing?  Well that does add up, according to an online calculator it would cost me about 50 dollars a year to do an extra load of laundry a week.  With just a few diapers per week though I often just throw them in with a load of towels or clothes after I handwash them and get the smell out.

The cost savings is huge and the more you wear the more you save.  If you have access to a sewing machine you can sew your own prefolds for about half what you could buy them and save even more money.

Cloth 1 Disposable 0

Dry Feel:  A dry disposable diaper feels nice, but a dry cloth diaper feels much nicer.  A good cloth diaper is so bulky that it forces you to waddle more like a baby and I personally love the tightness and pressure of the bulk between my legs.

Cloth 1 Disposable 0

Wet Feel:   I really enjoy the feeling of a quality disposable when they get wet and swollen. The feeling of a big squishy soft diaper is amazing. A cloth diaper doesn’t provide that same kind of feeling that a good soaked disposable diaper does.  A good cloth diaper will soak up a lot of pee and not feel uncomfortable for awhile but when they are saturated I find them uncomfortable.

Cloth 0 Disposable 1

Look:  This is another personal question, what looks better?  Of course there are new adult disposables with baby print that look adorable, and big puffy plastic Abena looks really cute too.  A super bulky all-in-one is also super cute and babyish.  Plastic pants are available in all kinds of cute prints and colors.  It’s a toss up for me.

Cloth 1 Disposable 1

Leaks:  Cheap disposables leak like crazy, good ones don’t.  Same for good cloth diapers.  I don’t really feel like one does a better job then the other when you’re dealing with good diapers.

Cloth 1 Disposable 1

Convience:  This is a big one against cloth, especially if you poop your diapers.  Cloth are going to take some extra work, washing, folding, they even take longer to put on.  A wet or messy disposable is just folded up and thrown away.

Discreetness:  Now this one really only matters if you need or want to wear your diapers outside of the home.  I have worn disposables to work, school, and really just about anywhere.  Mind you these were not the super thick variety usually, though I have worn them out too.  I’m certain it would be impossible to tell.  I have worn some thin cloth diapers out a few times, but was really to scared to use them since I was sure they would leak.  Cloth diapers have so much thickness that they are almost impossible to hide under clothes, except maybe in winter and even then you’re going to have to try to hide that cloth diaper waddle.

Cloth 0 Disposable 1

Final score

Cloth 4 Disposable 4   A tie.

I considered adding an environmental category which cloth would win, but decided against it.  A person with a great deal of environmental concern may be swayed by that, but I don’t feel like I wear enough diapers to make much of a difference one way or the other.  I’m sure a years with of used disposable diapers for someone who wore more would really add up, but my few diapers a week isn’t going to make much difference.

To me the real answer isn’t should I use cloth or disposable, it’s why not use both?  You an build a cloth diaper stash easily,

 

When you open your HDIS sample pack sticking out so that it can’t be missed are two Abri-Form Premuium L4 diapers.  These diapers are easily twice as thick as any other diaper in the pack.  I’ve wore the classic X-plus Abri-form L4 and was blown away by it, by far the best diaper I’ve ever worn.  The time had come to try one of these Premium DIapers.

The Premium is about the same as the X-plus, except it has a cloth cover and different tapes, it has the same thickness, stand up leak guards, and generous fit.  I put on a little rash ointment since I expected to be in these for awhile.  I expected the Premium to have a hook and loop fastener so I didn’t clean my fingers off.  I put the diaper on and realized that an Abena large is probably to big for me, I could probably wear a medium since they are much larger then many brands.  I started to go out for a walk, but noticed one of the tapes wasn’t sticking very well.  I restuck it and left.  When I got back the same tape was not staying stuck to well so I restuck it again and realized that it wasn’t a hook and loop fastener, but a sticky tape with a tiny hook and loop fastener that seemd to do nothing. the sticky part was longer very sticky since I got ointment on it.  I pulled the diaper up as high as it would go and tied my tights very tight underneath it so they were holding it up.  It was barely wet at this point but it was loser then it had been when I put it on.

The cloth backed Abena is very quiet and I could never hear that I had it on.  It’s also pretty thick, I was wearing loose workout shorts and I’m pretty sure no one could see how my rear was a bit puffy, as long as I had a kind of long shirt I wouldn’t be afraid to wear one of these in public, but I’d be a bit apprehensive about bending over, they have a very distinct outline since they are so thick.  The cloth backed diaper is also noticeably more comfortable on a hot day, much less prickly heat and sweat.

I did some work outside and wet a bit more and as expected the Abena doesn’t feel wet even after a 3 wettings.  I decided to really give this a workout so I drank some coffee and water, soon I was like a fountain, and gushing small wettings frequently, I followed every wetting up with another drink.  After about 2 hours it was getting heavy and didn’t want to stay up, the tapes weren’t really staying tight so I used some duct tape and tried to fix it up.  About an hour later I noticed my computer chair was soaked, The duct tape wasn’t staying put and one of the leg gatherers was completely loose allowing pee to flow out.

The Premium will require another test, but it seems like the tapes suck.  They have the cool feature of some elastic where they connect to the rear of the diaper, which should mean you could do them up tight, but mine wouldn’t stay tight, there’s a good chance it was my fault for ruining the tapes.  Even so the Premium cloth backed Abena didn’t swell up like the X-plus does.  Like most cheaper types the wet absorbent material began working its way down the diaper and settled in the crotch, but don’t get me wrong.  It did begin to swell up, it just didn’t stay put, like it does in a baby diaper.

Since I had some time left and I didn’t want to change I grabbed one of my thick home made cloth diapers, and a cloth soaker and pinned them over the Abena, I was still wetting like a fountain and the wettness seemed to spread up the rear of the diaper and really swell out the back.  Last time I wore an Abena the rear padding didn’t even get wet.  I pinned the cloth diaper on very tight and as the Abena continued to absorb and swell I could feel the cloth diaper getting tighter and tighter.  It made for a really fun diaper experience.

HDIS sells the Abena at $2.60 when you buy a 12 pack, and yes that is with shipping, but that’s still far to much in my opinion, especially when you can buy the superior X-plys plastic backed diaper for  much less.  I can’t really pass judgment on the premium until I try the second one and make sure not to foul the tapes.

nqrbs-re-brief-maximum_bagNext up to review in our HDIS sample pack is the Reassure Maximum brief.  HDIS seems to be the only place selling these and I read that they have them made specifically for them so they seem to push them pretty hard on their website.  If you’ve ever bought drugstore brand diapers you’ll probably roll your eyes when you pull out the Reassure.  It looks almost identical to the prevail brand diapers that many drugstores carry and sell for around ten bucks a pack.  I’ve gone through lots of these, for along time the only place I would buy diapers was a particular drug store that only carried this brand.  Fortunately the Reassure Maximum Brief is not the the same as the super cheapo’s that you get at many drug stores.

The Reassure Maximum has a cloth cover, two hook and loop fasteners with blue cross hatch pattern per side, and is quite a bit thicker then their drug store counterparts.  The large size is a roomy fit but not entirely too big, I could probably wear the medium as well.  There is no waistband and no leak guards, like I said they are constructed exactly like drug store diapers, but have about twice as much absorbent padding.  If you’ve ever worn the drug store brand you might have noticed that after maybe an hour they are loose and about to fall off.  I had pretty much the exact same problem with these, they need to tightened several times.  The good news is that unlike the drug store version these actually can hold a few wettings, though I emphasize a few.

HDIS sells these for just a bit over a dollar a diaper, they are about the third cheapest diaper on their site, only thing cheaper is wings and home choice which I’d say are not as absorbent as these.

I wore this diaper for about 4 hours.  During the first hour I took a walk and never wet the diaper, during the second hour I drank a large glass of water and wet a little bit.  The first few wettings were readily absorbed and the gel inside swelled a bit.  The third hour saw me wet a couple more times.  Probably on the third wetting I could tell that my rear end was getting damp.  I made the mistake of sitting down on the bed and when I got up had left two wet spots on the sheets.  I didn’t feel like I had wet that much for the diaper to be just leaking out like that.  I think one of the biggest problems is that they leg cuffs aren’t elastic enough and don’t adjust tight enough to really make a good seal so the pee just flows right out once the center is soaked.

qrb1By this point all the front padding had fell down and was stuck in the front and the rear padding was starting to get really damp,  Like the Attends the diaper became like wearing a big sack between the legs.  I retaped it even tighter and decided to keep wearing it until I had to go to work.   I placed a folded up towel on my computer chair and did some work, by the 4th hour the towel was soaked and the chair was damp.  The shorts I was wearing were getting soaked as well.  The diaper should have been changed about two hours ago.

One of my favorite things about these types of diapers is that they do have larger fasteners and they can be refastened several times.  If you pull them tight  and place them side by side on the front of the diaper it looks much more like a baby diaper and works just about as well, or as bad.

So I can’t totally knock the Reassure, they aren’t horrible, but once they hit their absorbency limit you’d better change them or expect to have wet pants.  They are actually very similar to wearing a drug store diaper with a baby diaper soaker, except the baby diaper soaker will probably leak less and can be tossed and a new one put in.  Considering you can get like 16 of these for ten dollars at Walgreens and add a Luvs diaper soaker for about 15 cents more per diaper you’d probably be better off.

There is also a Reassure Overnight that I have yet to try, it looks quite a bit thicker and I’m looking forward to testing it.

The Tena Stretch diaper comes in an Ultra absorbency and a Super absorbency, my sample was the Ultra and Northshore Care says it’s capacity is 19 oz.   When I first took the diaper out and looked it at I was kind of surprised by its size.  It’s a Large/XL but to me much closer to the XL.  The diaper doesn’t have stand up leak guards, but does have a good stretchy cuff.  The Stretch brief is cloth covered and has elastic side attachments.  It is fastnened by one large hook and loop fastener per side, so its made pretty much an oversized modern baby diaper.  The L/XL size was too big for me in pretty much all dimensions.  I had to pull the sides so close that they actually met in the center of the front panel.  It took a bit a futzing to get them to connect but once they did they stayed.

I was fascinated by the diapers construction because i realized it was truly like a blown up baby diaper and could be even more so if the hook and loop fasteners were cut down just a bit.  I wore the diaper out and around for awhile and found it to be very quiet and very comfortable.  Because it was so large it was more noticeable under my shorts then some, but not so bad that I felt self conscious.  Absorbency wise it worked well, it didn’t leak though I know I didn’t really soak it all at once.  As it started getting more full and heavier the more secure and elastic fit seemed to help it stay up and be more comfortable.

The Ultra medium size is very nicely priced, it comes in packs of 36 and sells for less then a dollar a diaper.  The medium ultra size is also lavender which I would much prefer over the beige. This could be a real great diaper if the Medium fits me better, the medium only claims 16 oz absorbency but if you paired it with a big booster it could be a great around the house diaper, and its size and great fit make it excellent for wearing out.  I’m definitely going to try the stretch in medium next time I order diapers and if I was actually diaper dependent and the Medium fits better it might be one of my all time favorites.

I received a Tranquility Slimline diaper in my HDIS variety pack and tried it out recently.  Slimlines are available in plastic or cloth covered, my sample was plastic.  It is pretty similar to the Tranquility ATN which I’ve already used in fact its basically the same diaper with less thickness.  Coming from the Attends I was surprised by how quiet the Tranquility was in comparison.  The plastic is less crinkly and stays stuck pretty well to the absorbent mat inside.  It has two tapes and fits pretty decently, but once stuck the tapes will not come unstuck without ripping the diaper.  It’s not as bulky as its overnight counterpart the ATN or the Attends even, but not as trim fitting as a Depend.  It’s not very noticeably under clothes though and the quieter plastic helps with that.    I wore this diaper for about 4 hours and did several activities in it including alot of walking.  After a couple of decent wettings it was still in pretty good shape.  It’s noticeably more absorbent then the Attends I had just worn or the Depends I usually wear.  At about 3 hours it began to clump but no where near as bad as the Attends did. At 4 hours and 3-4 decent wettings it was on the verge of failing.

The Tranquility briefs have double cuff leak barriers like most better diapers, but they noticeably not as good as an Abenas or really even a Depends which has a good stand up leak guards.  The Slimlines will still outperform a Depend diaper with its high absorbency.  Tranquility’s peach mat pad is very good at staying together even when very wet.    It’s rated at 22 ounces for a size large.  And at Northshore care is available for a bit under one dollar per diaper for the plastic backed version.

The Tranquility slimline is a bit more expensive then a Wings or Attends brand, but not by very much.  If you’ve tried WIngs, which is in my opinion probably the most common diaper sold for incontience, at least its the most common that shows up in thrift stores, then you know just how bad an adult diaper can be.  The Tranquility slimline is a good diaper for the price, but you can get a ATN for just about 20 cents more a diaper and probably wear it nearly twice as long.  If you are a person who needs a more discreet diaper then a great option could be Slimlines with booster pads, which would give you similar absorbency to an ATN for only a little bit more money and the option of having a thinner diaper when you need it.

I’m going to be working my way through my HDIS variey pack and giving my impressions of the diapers.

Lets start with Attends with waistband.  The second package of adult diapers I ever purchased was Attends back around 99 when they were available in Wal-Marts.  These were the Proctor and Gamble brand and were really great.  More on them another day.

Attends are an all together differnent creature now.  They are quite a bit cheaper, selling by the case for around 76 cents per diaper.  They are plastic backed and they have a similar waistband to the old ones, and 3 tapes though the tapes are different.  The tapes were very good and once stuck for awhile would not come unstuck at all.   The first thing that I noticed about Attends when I first tried them was how much more roomy they were.  Where Depends seemed to be designed to fit more like Underwear Attends were snug around the legs but a bit puffy everywhere else, more roomy and thicker.  They are still designed to be more roomy then other diapers I think but they no longer have the thicker padding.  They were a bit more noticeable under my pants from their larger size, but far more noticeable was the plastic rustling, they are really noisy.  The abosrbent core isn’t stuck very well to the plastic and they make a ton of noise.

I wore an Attend for about an hour working outside then a couple more hours in the house.  At first it seemed a bit more absorbent then a Depends, but soon I realized I was wrong.  I wet while sitting on the couch; when  I got up I was surprised to see two big wet spots where it had ran out the sides, at this point that diaper wasn’t really that wet but it had already failed.  THere are no leak guards and I believe that leak guards really help when a diaper is flooded with a larger volume, but there are no leak guards in lots of diapers that perform better than this.

As I continued to wear the Attend and be mindful of sitting on the furniture it became to resemble wearing a big plastic bag filled with goop.  The abosrbing material all packed in the middle and formed a big goopy wad.

XP medical has the Attends maximum capacity at 18 oz.  Even though its the cheapest diaper they sell, its the most expensive per ounce of capacity.

For an incontinent persons purposes I think the Attends was pretty horrible.  Noisy, hard to hide, prone to leak and needing to be changed after a couple of wettings.  For an adult baby’s purposes it could be an OK diaper.  If you want to experience a leaky, saggy, noisy diaper that is hard to hide and feels like wearing a big plastic bag this is the diaper to go with.